The New England Classic
Developing: UIS Set to Dictate Whether Students Go to Heaven or Hell

Developing: UIS Set to Dictate Whether Students Go to Heaven or Hell

SchoolStudent Life November 13, 2020 The New England Classic

Next semester, students will have the opportunity to register for a class that will determine whether they will live forever in blessed communion with... Developing: UIS Set to Dictate Whether Students Go to Heaven or Hell

As course registration proceeds apace for Boston College undergraduates, one course has caught the eye of many students. Next semester, students will have the opportunity to register for a class that will determine whether they will live forever in blessed communion with the Lord or find themselves chained to the infernal river in the dominion of Satan.

The course, entitled “Heaven or Hell? Your Eternal Judgement,” will have two sections, cross-listed as HEVN1001 and HELL3666. Professor J.C. Messiah of the theology department will teach one of the sections in person on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays at noon. Meanwhile, Luke Ferr of the finance department is set to lead the other online synchronously, meeting at 9 A.M. on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

Course evaluations have varied wildly, with Ferr’s section having an overall rating of 1.02 while Messiah’s section has an average of 4.93.

“I was hoping to get a sense of what the professors were like, but nobody I know has taken it before,” said Calvin Jones (MCAS ’23). “I’ve heard that Professor Messiah assigns a ton of reading but still is, like, really chill.”

The syllabus for Messiah’s section is unusual in that it allows for unlimited unexcused absences. However, the course document also details that students should not directly ask the instructor any questions. Instead, they are told to reach out for help in the class by emailing the course’s teaching assistant, Sara Phim (STM ’21), or else by calling Messiah’s mother on the phone and asking her to speak with her son.

There are less favorable rumors surrounding Ferr’s section. Previous students have complained that Ferr assigns 500-word reflections for every class meeting, which he reportedly does not return until the last week of classes. Many students also report that Ferr always smells like smoke.

Ferr’s syllabus contains a list of five required textbooks for the course, each of which costs more than $150, even though the class will only need to read one small chapter from each of them. In addition, there is one sentence of instructions for a 25-page paper due during the middle of the semester, which can be written on any topic of the student’s choosing.

As is custom for the course registration period, some students have been disappointed to find that their preferred section was closed.

“I was really hoping I could get into the Messiah section, but it was closed by the time I registered,” said Luther Martino (MCAS ’24). “I got in touch with him asking to get on the waiting list. But he basically wrote back to me saying, ‘Look, it’s great that you’re emailing me and believing that you should be in the class, but these good works alone won’t get you in.’”

Some students have not been able to get into either section, including those who forgot their course registration code. For this group, the University has created a third, smaller section listed as PURG4709.