The New England Classic
Thursday’s Globalization Lecture Canceled After Old Tweets Resurface

Thursday’s Globalization Lecture Canceled After Old Tweets Resurface

SchoolStudent Life October 23, 2019 The New England Classic

MCGUINN HALL — Professor Rachel Godwin’s Thursday afternoon Globalization I lecture was canceled early Wednesday morning after damning tweets resurfaced that called into question... Thursday’s Globalization Lecture Canceled After Old Tweets Resurface

MCGUINN HALL — Professor Rachel Godwin’s Thursday afternoon Globalization I lecture was canceled early Wednesday morning after damning tweets resurfaced that called into question the professor’s credibility as an authority on historical information.

Posted late in August of 2017, the tweets themselves were a diatribe on the necessity of pineapple on pizza. Professor Godwin created a thread to string together her ideas, ending the first tweet with “(1/?)” and finishing with “(269/269).”

Up until recently, the course has been covering early global interactions, moving through the spice trade and the “discovery” of the Americas by Europeans. While Thursday’s lecture was supposed to discuss attempts to evangelize the native populations, students instead will be holding a roundtable discussion on whether pineapple really does belong on pizza.

“We really just wanted to give people a place to air their thoughts on the presence of fruit on pizza,” said Teaghan King (MCAS ’23), a member of Godwin’s class and the student organizer behind the discussion. “While we are aware that tomatoes are a fruit, we think the presence of an overtly sweet, tropical fruit is a really polarizing subject for many students. Hopefully, we can arrive at some sort of peaceful conclusion.”

The roundtable will take place during the scheduled lecture time of 3:00 PM. As of yet, there has been no word on whether Professor Godwin will resume her lectures next Tuesday.

At press time, biology professor Ryan Tracy was seen deleting tweets from before 2014 that reportedly regarded vaccinations.